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Tanzania Mammals Glossary

Scientific name : Chrysochloris stuhlmanni

IUCN Status : LC (Least Concern)

The dunes host the golden, carnivorous mole, which passes most of the day buried in the sand. Discovered in 1837, it was not seen again until 1963. Devoid of eyes and ears, it makes its way through the dunes thanks to a small piece of flesh that allows it

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Scientific name : Manis gigantea

IUCN Status : VU (Vulnerable)

A large, heavy-set pangolin with very large rounded scales. The face is naked with a long muzzle. Giant pangolins have relatively long front legs and adopt a more quadrupedal stance than other pangolins. The tail is shorter than the body and has a pointed tip. They are solitary and water dependant. This species is nocturnal, during the day they rest in thick vegetation or nest from other species. They feed mainly on termites and ants, and also invertebrates and larvae. They are believed to aestivate for long periods during times of poor food supply. When disturbed, they will curp up into a tight ball for protection and swing their heavy tail at an intruder.

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Scientific name : Phacochoerus africanus

IUCN Status : LC (Least Concern)

Common warthogs occur wherever there is dense cover and water supply, including bushland, forests and agricultural lands. They are omnivorous feeding on a wide range of foods. They use their long snouts to root through soil leaving distinctive patches or vegetation. They are mainly nocturnal and live in groups of 4-16 individuals, led by dominant male and female. Home range from 0.2 to 10km².

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Scientific name : Potamochoerus larvatus

IUCN Status : LC (Least Concern)

A medium-sized pig with a long muzzle. Coat colour is highly variable ranging from light red to almost black. There is a prominent dorsal crest that is usually back-tipped with white hairs. The lower tusks are long (up to 23cm) and the upper tusks are much shorter and very sharp. They occur wherever there is dense cover and regular water supply. They are omnivorous, feeding on small birds and mammals, fruits, grass and crops. They use their long snouts to root through soil leaving distinctive patches or upturned vegetation. They are mainly nocturnal and live in groups of 4-16 individuals led by a dominant male and a dominant female.

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Scientific name : Manis temminckii

IUCN Status : VU (Vulnerable)

Ground pangolins are covered in large 11 -13 rows of brown scales made of fused hair. The head is small and the nose is short and pointed, the tailis very muscular. They live in savanna and woodland and are absent from forests, swamps & deserts. They feed exclusively on ants and termites, which they lick with an enormous (25-40cm) tongue. When alarmed, they roll into a tight ball. They are solitary and nocturnal, although subadults are more active during the day

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Scientific name : Manis tricuspis

IUCN Status : VU (Vulnerable)

A small pangolin with a very long tail and small scales, absent on the chin, belly and inside the legs. They are found in woodland and forests. They are nocturnal, solitary and semi-arboreal. Their main food source is termites which they lick up with their long (30cm) tongue. They feed mostly on the ground, although they will also break open ants’ nests up in the trees.

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Scientific name : Atelerix albiventris

IUCN Status : LC (Least Concern)

A small animal with numerous shorts spines (1.5-2.5cm) covering the upperparts of the body. Underparts and body face are white, while the ears and nose are black. They are found in a wide variety of habitats including open grassland, wooded savanna, open forests, urban gardens and agricultural land. Their diet consist mostly of small invertebrates although they will also consume small rodents, small reptiles, eggs, roots and fruits. They are nocturnal and mostly solitary, occasionally seen in mother-offsprings pairs. When disturbed, they will roll into a tight ball, using their spine as a defense mechanism.

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Scientific name : Leptailurus serval

IUCN Status : LC (Least Concern)

Un chat mince et tacheté avec de longues jambes, une petite tête et une queue courte. Fourrure de couleur jaunâtre avec des taches noires allongées formant de longues rayures sur le haut du cou.

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Scientific name : Hylochoerus meinertzhageni

IUCN Status : LC (Least Concern)

A medium-sized pig with a long muzzle. Coat colour is highly variable ranging from light red to almost black. There is a prominent dorsal crest that is usually back-tipped with white hairs. The lower tusks are long (up to 23cm) and the upper tusks are much shorter and very sharp. They occur wherever there is dense cover and regular water supply. They are omnivorous, feeding on small birds and mammals, fruits, grass and crops. They use their long snouts to root through soil leaving distinctive patches or upturned vegetation. They are mainly nocturnal and live in groups of 4-16 individuals led by a dominant male and a dominant female.

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